She-Ra And The Princesses Of Power To Feature Its First Non-Binary Character In Season 4

Credit: Netflix

She-Ra and the Princesses of Power makes sure to tell a good story and also make the show as inclusive as possible for the people watching it. The show features openly gay and lesbian characters, an entire spectrum of different races, and gives them all a chance to be badass in some amazing ways.

Season four of the popular animated series is just around corner. With it, we’ll see Adora (Aimee Carrero) and Catra (Aly Michalka) go head to head with the gloves firmly off following the episode season three finale.

In some key art for the upcoming season, we’ve seen an unknown person sitting next to Catra, who is now ruling the Horde. Today, we’ve learned their identity.

Their name is Double Trouble and they are the series’ first non-binary character. They are also voiced by real life non-binary activist and author Jacob Tobia. The announcement was made on Netflix’s Prism account on Monday, Oct. 21. Tobia is so adorably excited for their role that we can’t even.

 

They are so cute even changing all their icons on social media to Double Trouble, who is described as “a non-binary shape-shifting mercenary from the Crimson Waste, who joins forces with Catra and the Horde. Able to magically transform themselves into any person they see, Double Trouble has the soul of a thespian, spending hours in ‘character study’ trying to perfectly mimic their target, and always looking for feedback on their ‘performance’ – just don’t ever give them a negative critique.”

We already love them.

She-Ra and the Princesses of Power will release its fourth season on Monday, Nov. 4 on Netflix.

Bec Heim

Senior Editor at 4YE
Rebecca "Bec" Heim is the Senior Editor for 4YE. She has a BA in English Literature from the University of Scranton. She also has an MA in Film-Radio-Television from Syracuse University and an MFA in Screenwriting from Boston University. She enjoys reading through her ever growing mountain of books, talking way too much about superheroes, and trying to reach transcendental state.
Bec Heim
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