Black Panther Was Built Around A Key Piece Of Dialogue

Credit: Marvel Studios

Black Panther will, hopefully, make history at the Academy Awards by being the first superhero film to win Best Picture. Though the film is already one for the records in practically every single way.

Apparently, the journey to making one of the greatest superhero movies of our time started with just one line.

Talking with The Hollywood Reporter, Marvel Studios boss Kevin Feige shared the journey of the internationally acclaimed film. What started it all was one line that set the tone for the movie from the very first script.

“It was in those early discussions that we had with Ryan, that he had with Nate Moore, our executive producer at Marvel who brought [writer/director Ryan Coogler] in to meet with us. And that amazing line, that he and his co-writer, Joe Robert Cole, wrote for Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan) as he lay dying outside the vibranium mines looking over Wakanda. T’Challa says, ‘I can try to heal you,’ and he says, ‘Why, so you can lock me up? Just bury me in the ocean with my ancestors who jumped ships, ’cause they knew death was better than bondage.'” That was in the first draft.”

The line is the last words of Killmonger said before his death. We can certainly how it would influence subsequent drafts of Black Panther. Plus, the impact it had on audiences.

Seriously, Michael B Jordan was robbed of that Oscar nom for Best Supporting Actor.

Feige continued, “It was one of the best lines we ever read. We said, ‘There are going to be a lot of revisions, but don’t touch that line.’ And Ryan said, ‘That’s the line I thought you’d tell me to cut.’ And we said, ‘On the contrary, keep it and build more of the movie around it.'”

Damn, if we aren’t glad that they kept it in.

Bec Heim

Senior Editor at 4YE
Rebecca "Bec" Heim is the Senior Editor for 4YE. She has a BA in English Literature from the University of Scranton. She also has an MA in Film-Radio-Television from Syracuse University and an MFA in Screenwriting from Boston University. She enjoys reading through her ever growing mountain of books, talking way too much about superheroes, and trying to reach transcendental state.
Bec Heim
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