Winston Duke On Why Black Panther Shows That Representation Makes For Better Stories

Credit: Marvel Studios

It’s crazy to believe that Black Panther only came out this year, right? Or this could be a sign of how time is increasingly becoming meaningless in this day and age.

Or how long this year has felt.

Either way, Black Panther is an amazing movie from start to finish and full of wonderful performances from amazing actors across the board. It also proved, according to star Winston Duke, that representation works.

Talking with Entertainment Weekly at SCAD Savannah Film Festival, Duke, who plays Jabari leader M’Baku, shared his thoughts about the film. Mainly that all of the characters in the film were given their own distinct personalities and skills.

“That’s what’s powerful about these stories. This movie didn’t say we were a monolith. The structure has always been, you’re all the same. You have a leading man frame, but there’s only room for one. That’s usually how it’s felt in the past.”

He continued with his answer, “So it can’t be Michael B. Jordan and Chadwick Boseman and Winston Duke and Daniel Kaluuya. But we were all in one movie, and the movie did a beautiful job of highlighting our differences. I think it’s showing us that there’s room for all of us. I think it will and should impact the way Hollywood views the creation of their lead characters. “

After the run of successful series and films boasting a diverse cast and creative team, we’re definitely in agreement. Films like Black Panther and Crazy Rich Asians should pave the way for a greater diversity from the film and television industry.

Bec Heim

Senior Editor at 4YE
Rebecca "Bec" Heim is the Senior Editor for 4YE. She has a BA in English Literature from the University of Scranton. She also has an MA in Film-Radio-Television from Syracuse University and an MFA in Screenwriting from Boston University. She enjoys reading through her ever growing mountain of books, talking way too much about superheroes, and trying to reach transcendental state.
Bec Heim
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