Brie Larson Was Scared Of A Captain Marvel Casting Backlash

Credit: Marvel
Credit: Marvel

One of the biggest bits of news that came out San Diego Comic Con was the announcement of who will be playing Captain Marvel.

Granted, we all knew that Brie Larson was probably going to play the iconic superhero. Usually, when an actor enters talks for a role, then they normally end up with the role.

Unless, somehow, those talks break down.

On the whole, Larson probably isn’t my personal first choice to play Carol Danvers. In the grand scheme of things, however, she’s not a bad one. I’ve seen Room, I know how good of an actor she is. I’m happy with the decision.

(Secretly, I was holding out for Gwendoline Christie.)

For the most part, the Internet seems okay with the decision as well. Or, at least, the parts of the Internet that I stick to.

It was the Internet’s reaction, though, that made Larson the most nervous.

A photo posted by Brie (@brielarson) on

In a post to her Instagram, Larson wrote:

I know who I am, but it’s wild how quickly you can forget once someone calls you something terrible. I was reminded how the acceptance of community is a deeply rooted need — but I don’t want to live worried people will hate me because I’m myself! We should all have the freedom to be our authentic selves without fear or judgment. It’s scary to chip away at all the hardness we coat ourselves with to protect that perfect little being inside. Yeah, people can be mean, but they can also be so many other wonderful things too. Let’s make this place a safe space. No hate and more understanding. To the followers that are new: welcome!”

Captain Marvel will be released in 2019.

Bec Heim

Senior Editor at 4YE
Rebecca "Bec" Heim is the Senior Editor for 4YE. She has a BA in English Literature from the University of Scranton. She also has an MA in Film-Radio-Television from Syracuse University and an MFA in Screenwriting from Boston University. She enjoys reading through her ever growing mountain of books, talking way too much about superheroes, and trying to reach transcendental state.
Bec Heim
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